Climb Details

Cost:
Deposit:
Length:
Difficulty:
Type:

$3600
$1500
15 day(s)
Level 3 difficulty 
Skills

Availability

Please call for program dates.

Upcoming Climbs

June 29, 2014 - FULL

Guide(s):

Elías de Andrés-Martos


Peru's Cordillera Blanca is one of the most spectacular mountain ranges in the world. The high peaks of the Cordillera offer phenomenal climbing and ideal opportunities for mountaineering training. RMI's Peru Seminar is a comprehensive mountaineering course designed to prepare you for adventures on Denali and other major glaciated peaks. Highlights include:

  • Trek up stunning mountain valleys and establish Base Camp in the heart of the Cordillera Blanca.
  • Build a solid mountaineering foundation with ascents of multiple summits.
  • Apply the skills taught throughout the trip on a participant-led ascent of 18,143' Ishinca.
  • Take part in an RMI adventure and see why we continue to set the standard in guiding excellence.

Ishinca

Our adventures begin in the foothills of the Peruvian Andes as we travel from Lima to the town of Huaraz, the gateway of the Cordillera Blanca. After organizing our gear and acclimatizing to the new altitudes in Huaraz, we head into the mountains. Mules help ferry our gear to Base Camp at 14,400', allowing us to make the approach with light daypacks.

With Base Camp established immediately beneath a cirque of our climbing objectives, we spend the next eight days alternating between training days and summit pushes, tackling the peaks of Nevado Urus (17,800'), Tocllaraju (19,796') and Ishinca (18,143') that surround Base Camp.

The ascent of Ishinca, the final climbing objective of the trip, is a participant-led climb. Participants apply the skills and techniques taught over the course of the program to lead the guides and the team on a summit bid.

Our Peru Seminar offers superb alpine climbing and is ideal for mountaineers looking to build their climbing skills for future climbing expeditions, climb to new elevations, and take part in the excitement of an international climbing expedition. The peaks of Nevado Urus, Tocllaraju, and Ishinca involve moderately steep slopes and prior knowledge of roped travel, crampon techniques, and ice axe arrest is recommended. A review of basic mountaineering techniques is built into the itinerary.

THE RMI DIFFERENCE

RMI was established in 1969 and is one of America's oldest and most-trusted guide services. We are the largest guide service on Mt. Rainier and Mt. McKinley and leaders in guiding climbs and treks around the globe. Our years of leading mountain adventures give us the experience and knowledge to create the best possible trips and we work hard to live up to our reputation as an industry leader. Our comprehensive trip preparation takes care of the details for you, from hotels to airport transfers, so that you can focus on preparing for the climb instead of the distraction that comes with coordinating logistics.

Huaraz, PeruClimbing the Ishinca Glacier

Our Peru Seminar is led by RMI’s top guides, who bring with them years of climbing experience on mountains all over the world, from the Andes to the Alaska Range to the Himalayas. As you reach higher elevations and test the limits of your experience, the value of an accomplished, highly trained RMI Guide held to our standards cannot be understated. We climb in Peru with a 3:1 climber to RMI Guide ratio to provide the important individual attention needed during the training and the climbs.

We use RMI's own climbing equipment brought from the U.S., ensuring that our expedition standards of safety, quality, and reliability are met. We've chosen our hotels and meals to keep our team comfortable, happy, and healthy throughout the climb. We use private vehicles to travel to the mountains, minimizing our time spent on the road and allowing us safer travel. Our exceptional focus on detail, our unparalleled level of climber attention, and our genuine excitement for these adventures are what make our programs truly memorable.

SAFETY

Safety has always been RMI's top priority and we strive to create the safest mountain experience possible. RMI's experienced team of guides focus on leading a fun and successful climb without compromising safety. We apply the same strict standards of safety we bring to the Alaska and the Himalayas to our climbs in Peru. Careful planning, precise ascent profiles, daily weather forecasts, and diligent attention are taken as we venture to high altitudes. Comprehensive medical kits, rescue equipment, and radio and satellite communication equipment are carried with the team throughout the trip.

As you prepare for your upcoming adventure please feel free to contact our office and speak directly to one of our experienced guides regarding equipment, conditioning, the route, or any other questions you may have about our programs. We are available Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at (888) 89-CLIMB or info@rmiguides.com.

Peru Seminar Itinerary

Peru Seminar Map

Day 1: TRAVEL DAY
Depart U.S. for Lima, Peru. Most flights arrive in Lima in the late evening. Upon arrival, a taxi ride takes you to our hotel. Overnight in Lima.

Day 2: HUARAZ  •  10,000'
We leave Lima and make the drive in a private van to Huaraz, the gateway to the Cordillera Blanca. The drive takes most of the day. In the afternoon, we explore Huaraz or relax at the hotel. (B)

Day 3: HUARAZ  •  10,000'
Today is spent reviewing the equipment we need for the climbs and acclimatizing in Huaraz. Overnight in Huaraz. (B)

Day 4: BASE CAMP  •  14,400'
Leaving Huaraz in the morning, we make the short drive to Collón (11,150'). We meet our mules and begin the trek through the Ishinca Valley. Several hours of hiking through alpine landscapes brings us to our Base Camp. (B, D)

Day 5: BASE CAMP TRAINING  •  14,400'
We spend the day at Base Camp, acclimatizing to the high altitudes of the Cordillera Blanca and discussing basic mountaineering techniques in preparation for our first climb. (B, D)

Day 6: NEVADO URUS SUMMIT DAY  •  17,800'
We make an early alpine start to climb Nevado Urus (17,800'). The climb is a straightforward snow climb and a great introduction to climbing in the Cordillera Blanca. After the climb, we descend back to Base Camp. (B, D)

Day 7: BASE CAMP TRAINING  •  14,400'
Building upon the skills introduced and practiced on Nevado Urus, we spend the day at Base Camp introducing more advanced skills and techniques. (B, D)

Day 8: TOCLLARAJU GLACIER CAMP  •  17,380'
We leave Base Camp and climb to our high camp below Tocllaraju. After establishing camp, we settle in for the evening. (B, D)

Day 9: TOCLLARAJU SUMMIT DAY  •  19,796'
Leaving high camp, we make our summit attempt on Tocllaraju (19,796'). The climbing is a mix of glacier travel and exciting, steep snow climbing to reach the mountain's summit. Following the ascent, we descend back to our high camp to retrieve our gear before descending to Base Camp for the evening. (B, D)

Day 10: BASE CAMP  •  14,400'
We spend the day resting at Base Camp, enjoying the stunning mountain panorama and relaxing between the climbs. (B, D)

Day 11: ISHINCA SUMMIT DAY  •  18,143'
The Seminar culminates in a participant-led ascent of Ishinca (18,143'). Climbers have the opportunity to put their new mountaineering skills into action and lead the team on a summit attempt. After the climb, we descend to Base Camp for the evening. (B, D)

Day 12: CONTINGENCY DAY
This extra day is scheduled into the itinerary in case we encounter poor weather or need additional time for acclimatization.

Day 13: HUARAZ  •  10,000'
We pack up Base Camp and descend back to the trailhead. A short drive brings us back to Huaraz where we enjoy hot showers and a celebration dinner. Overnight in Huaraz. (B)

Day 14: TRAVEL DAY
We return to Lima to catch evening flights home.

Day 15: TRAVEL DAY
Arrive home.

Expedition Skills Seminar - Peru Equipment List

Whittaker Mountaineering

The following is a list of required equipment. We may encounter a variety of weather conditions throughout our climb, including rain, wind, snow, sleet and extreme heat. Skimping on equipment can jeopardize your safety and success, so we want you to think carefully about any changes or substitutions you are considering. If you have questions regarding the equipment needed for your upcoming climb, give us a call and speak directly to one of our experienced guides.

Most of the required equipment is available for rent or purchase from our affiliate Whittaker Mountaineering. RMI climbers receive a 10% discount on new clothing and equipment items ordered from Whittaker Mountaineering. This offer excludes sale items. For internet orders, please use the discount code RMI2014.


Pack & Bag Guides' Pick

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2 DUFFEL BAG(S): A 120+ liter bag made of tough material with rugged zippers.


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BACKPACK: A 65-70+ liter pack large enough to carry all of your personal gear, food and water is the recommended size for this climb.  A separate summit pack is not needed.


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SLEEPING BAG: A bag rated 0° to 15° F. Either goose down or synthetic.


Technical Gear Guides' Pick

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ICE AXE: A technical ice axe or a hybrid ice axe/ ice tool is recommended.

 
 
 
Petzl Sum'Tec Ice Axe
 
Petzl Quark Ice Tool

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ICE HAMMER: A second technical ice climbing tool of 50 - 55 cm will be needed.

 
 
Petzl Quark Ice Tool with hammer head
 
 
Petzl Sum'Tec Ice Tool with hammer head

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ICE TOOL TETHER: An elastic tether or "umbilical cord."

 
Black Diamond Spinner

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CLIMBING HARNESS: We recommend a comfortable, adjustable alpine climbing harness. Removable, drop seat or adjustable leg loops are convenient for managing your clothing layers over the course of the climb and facilitate going to the bathroom.


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1 TRIPLE-ACTION LOCKING CARABINER(S): Used for clipping into the climbing rope.


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3 NON-LOCKING CARABINER(S): Used for pack ditch loop, etc.


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HELMET: A UIAA (Union Internationale des Associations d’Alpinisme) or CE (European Committee for Standardization) certified climbing helmet. Bicycle or ski helmets are designed for a different type of impact and will not substitute as a climbing helmet.


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CRAMPONS: The 12-point adjustable crampons designed for general mountaineering are ideal.


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AVALANCHE TRANSCEIVER: A digital transceiver is preferred; analog will work as well. If you rent a transceiver, one set of new batteries will be provided.


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TREKKING POLES: Lightweight and collapsible poles are preferred. Larger baskets work well with deep snow. Ski poles will also work.


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RAPPEL DEVICE: An ATC rappel device, ensure that it can handle rope sizes 6 to 13 mm.


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60 cm sewn sling ("single-length runner").


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24 ' PERLON CORD: 6 mm cordelette in one continuous length.


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15 ' PERLON CORD: 7 mm cordelette in one continuous length.


Head Guides' Pick

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BUFF / NECK GAITER / BALACLAVA: One item for face protection is required. Our primary recommendation is the Buff. A neck gaiter or balaclava is also acceptable.


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GLACIER GLASSES: You will need protective sunglasses, either dark-lensed with side shields or full wrap-around frames. Almost all sunglasses block UV-A, UV-B and infrared rays adequately. Pay attention to the visible light transmission. The darkest lenses (glacier glasses) only allow approx. 6% visible light to get through, while lighter lenses (driving glasses) let in as much as 20+ %. A good rule of thumb is that if you can see the wearer’s pupils through the lenses, they are too light for sun protection at altitude.


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GOGGLES: Amber or rose-tinted goggles for adverse weather. On windy days, climbers, especially contact lens wearers, may find photochromatic lenses the most versatile in a variety of light conditions.


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HEADLAMP: Be sure to begin the program with fresh batteries.


Hands

Each glove layer is worn separately as conditions change during the climb.


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HEAVY WEIGHT GLOVE: Wind/water resistant, insulated gloves. These also serve as emergency back-ups if you drop or lose a glove.


Upper Body

We recommend a minimum of five upper body layers, all of which can be used in conjunction with each other. Two of these should be insulating layers, one light and one medium, that fit well together. Today there are many different layering systems to choose from, including fleece, soft-shell, down and synthetic options.


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LIGHT TO MEDIUM WEIGHT BASELAYER: Long-sleeve wool or synthetic top. Quarter zip styles will allow for better temperature regulation. We recommend light colors, which best reflect the intense sun on hot days.


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RAIN JACKET (HARD SHELL): A jacket made of rain-proof material with an attached hood.  We recommend a thinner lightweight jacket rather than a heavier insulated jacket.


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INSULATED PARKA with HOOD: This expedition-style heavy parka should extend below the waist and must have an insulated hood. While the parka is worn primarily at rest breaks on summit day, it serves as an emergency garment if needed. We recommend down rather than synthetic fill as down weighs less. The parka does not have to be waterproof, though that is a nice feature.


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SPORTS BRA: We recommend a moisture-wicking, active-wear bra.


Lower Body

We recommend a system of four layers, all of which can be used in conjunction with each other. Products which combine several layers into one garment, such as traditional ski pants, don’t work well as they don’t offer the versatility of a layering system.


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CLIMBING PANT: Soft-shell climbing pants offer a wide range of versatility. You can wear them in combination with the base layer on colder days, or alone on warmer days.


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RAIN PANT (HARD SHELL): A waterproof pant with 3/4 side zippers (sometimes called 7/8 or full side zips) are required for facilitating quick clothing adjustments over boots and crampons.


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HIKING SHORTS: Good for lower elevations and warm, sunny days.


Feet Guides' Pick

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MOUNTAINEERING BOOTS: Hybrid boots are the preferred choice in Peru. They provide the best insulation as well as a more rigid sole for kicking steps and holding crampons. Leather-only mountaineering boots are not recommended.


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HIKING BOOTS: A pair of lightweight boots for approaches and hiking on rugged terrain.


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GAITERS: We recommend a knee-length pair of gaiters, large enough to fit over your mountaineering boots. This will protect you from catching your crampon spikes on loose clothing.


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3 PAIR OF SOCKS: Either wool or synthetic. Whatever sock combination you are accustomed to wearing during your training or previous adventures (whether single medium weight socks, a medium weight with a liner sock, two medium weight socks together, etc), should work just fine for this climb.


Miscellaneous Items Guides' Pick

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LIP BALM: We recommend SPF 15 or higher.


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SUNSCREEN: We recommend small tubes of SPF 15 or higher, which can be carried in pockets for easy access and to prevent freezing.


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MEALS: See the Food tab for suggestions and quantities.


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2 WATER BOTTLES: Hard-sided, screw-top, one-liter water bottles with wide mouths are required.


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2 - 3 GARBAGE BAGS (LARGE): We recommend lining your backpack with garbage bags to keep items in your backpack completely dry.


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2 SETS ALKALINE BATTERIES: For avalanche transceiver.


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LUGGAGE LOCKS: For your duffel bags. Must be TSA approved.


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CAMERA


Travel Clothes

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2 CASUAL PANTS


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4 SHIRTS: For hotel dinners and while traveling.


Toilet Articles

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TOOTHBRUSH


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HAND SANITIZER(S): Personal size (2 oz.) bottle.


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PEE BOTTLE (PEE FUNNEL FOR WOMEN)


Personal First Aid Kit

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ANTIBIOTIC OINTMENT (FOR CUTS & SCRAPES)


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BAND-AIDS


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ASPRIN / IBUPROFEN / TYLENOL


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BLISTER TREATMENT

 
Dr. Scholl's Blister Cushions and Moleskin
 
Spenco 2nd Skin

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ANTACIDS


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IMODIUM (ANTI-DIARRHEA)


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PEPTO-BISMOL (STOMACH RELIEF)


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SMALL ROLL OF ADHESIVE TAPE


Personal Medications

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ANTIBIOTICS: Broad spectrum antibiotics for Traveler's Diarrhea.


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TYLENOL #3: Tylenol 3 for pain


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ACETAZOLAMIDE: For Altitude Illness


Utensils Guides' Pick

Optional Items

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BABY POWDER


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READING MATERIAL / JOURNAL


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iPOD or MP3 PLAYER


Travel Documents

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PASSPORT: Valid for six months beyond your return date.


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COPY OF PASSPORT: The first two pages of your passport.


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COPY OF FLIGHT ITINERARY


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2 EXTRA PASSPORT PHOTOS


Pre-Trip Checklist

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Purchase travel insurance.


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Return the Registration Packet to the RMI Office.


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Purchase airplane tickets.


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Reserve rental equipment.


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Be in the Best Shape of Your Life!


Provided Equipment

RMI provides the following equipment for your program: tents, stoves, group cooking equipment, fuel, climbing ropes, climbing anchors, avalanche probes, shovels, and blue bags (for solid waste disposal).

Every guide on your climb will carry rescue equipment and a first aid kit. Each climb has two-way radios and a satellite phone for emergency contact.


* Accommodations are based on double occupancy.  A Single Supplement Fee will be charged to those occupying single accommodations by choice or circumstance.

Risk Management

Safety is RMI's number one priority. Our guides manage significant hazards inherent in mountaineering such as avalanches, ice fall, rock fall, inclement weather, and high winds, but they cannot eliminate them. RMI guides draw from their wealth of experience and training to make sound decisions that improve your chance of reaching the summit without compromising the necessary margin of safety.

Please clearly understand that mountaineering is inherently a hazardous sport. You are choosing to engage in an activity in which participants have been injured and killed. While those accidents are indeed infrequent, they may occur at any time and be out of our control. We ask that participants acknowledge the risk and hazards of mountaineering, and make their own choices about whether or not to engage in this activity. 

Climber Responsibilities

Mountaineering is both an individual challenge and a team endeavor. Some of the responsibility for the team is carried by the individual climbers. For this reason, we ask that each participant:

  • is physically and mentally fit, properly attired and equipped, and continues to self assess throughout the program to ensure as safe a climb as possible. If a climber's own physical fitness limits his or her ability to safely continue upward, that can have a negative impact on the summit experience or opportunity of other climb participants.
  • honestly and accurately describe themselves, in terms of fitness, health and skills, and their equipment to their guides, and that they adhere to the advice of their professional mountain guide.

Age-Appropriate Guidelines & Restrictions

In the interest of the safety and well-being of all participants, RMI adheres to the following age-appropriate guidelines and restrictions on all climbing programs, domestic and international.

  • Ages 15 & under: No participants age 15 & under
  • Ages 16 & 17: Accompanied by parent or legal guardian
  • Ages 18 & above: No restrictions 

An individual’s birthday must precede the departure date of the program. For example: a 15 year old who turns 16 on July 1 may participate on a program beginning July 2.

Accompaniment by parent or legal guardian is required for the program or climb.

Under-aged participants on Private Climb or Group Climb programs are assessed on an individual basis.

General Policies

RMI's program plans and itineraries are subject to change or adjustment based on a number of factors. These include, but are not limited to, route conditions, weather, terrain, and many other factors. RMI has complete discretion to change plans to accommodate any of these or other factors, including discretion to change program schedule or itinerary, and change guides or staff, as necessary for the proper and safe conduct of the program.

We reserve the right to cancel any program due to inadequate signups, weather or route conditions. In such a case, a full refund is given; however, RMI cannot be responsible for any additional expenses incurred in preparing for the program (i.e., airline tickets, equipment purchase or rental, hotel reservations).

RMI cannot guarantee that you will reach the summit. Weather, route conditions, your own abilities, or the abilities of other climbers may create circumstances that make an ascent unsafe, and you or your entire party may have to turn around without reaching the summit. Failure to reach the summit due to a person's own lack of fitness or to any of the events associated with mountaineering (such as weather, route, avalanche hazard, team dynamics, etc.), are not Rainier Mountaineering, Inc.'s responsibility and will not result in refund or reschedule.

If the Participant decides to leave a trip at any time after the start of the trip and prior to its conclusion, he or she will not be entitled to a refund.

RMI reserves the right to dismiss the Participant from a trip or to send the Participant to a lower altitude at any time if RMI determines, in its sole discretion, that the Participant is not physically, technically, or psychologically prepared for or capable of participating in the program.