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RMI Hosts Prep for Rainier Classes at REI

RMI is hosting several Prep for Rainier classes over the months of February, March, and April at local REI stores in the Puget Sound area. Join RMI’s experienced guides to discuss everything that is needed to prepare for Mt. Rainier, including conditioning, trip planning, route selection, and equipment selection to climb Washington State’s highest point!

Come out to your local REI store to hear stories and answer your questions about Mt. Rainier!

Tuesday 4/15/2014 7:00pm REI Redmond with RMI Guide Paul Maier More info…

Nice idea - any chance of youtube?

Posted by: wraalstad on 3/6/2013 at 6:10 am

Hey, how about a class at the Spokane store ? I would be there. Would like to do Rainier this summer and it would be great to be prepared. Thanks. David

Posted by: David Seurynck on 2/15/2013 at 10:50 pm


Mountaineering Training | Fit To Climb: Week 4

By the end of this week you’ll be a quarter of the way through Fit To Climb! This week’s should be familiar, except we will add a Fitness Test on Day 6.

Fit to Climb: Week 4 Schedule

DAY WORKOUT TOTAL TIME DIFFICULTY
1 Rainier Dozen / Easy Hiking ( 30 min) 42 min. Medium
2 Rainier Dozen / Stair Interval Training (40 min) 52 min. Hard
3 Rainier Dozen / Rest 12 min. Recovery
4 Strength Circuit Training x 2 38 min. Hard
5 Rainier Dozen / Rest 12 min. Recovery
6 Rainier Dozen / Cross Training (1 hr) 72 min. Hard
7 Hike (3 hrs) 182 min. Medium
Total 6 hrs 46 mins


FITNESS TEST

In Fit To Climb we’ll do the test every four weeks to act as a measurement of overall fitness as well as specific core muscle endurance and agility. The repeated test is designed to show progress and these sessions should also be fun. Be sure to record your results from this week’s test and we can compare them to the results of the next test. As with all training, there should be an emphasis on safety and self care. Push your limits but don’t place undue stress or strain on your body. Rather than go all out, try to nudge your results forward in a controlled and sensible way, much like a successful mountain climb.

Complete the Fitness Test as follows:

After a good ten-minute warm-up followed by the Rainier Dozen, first do the timed run. Go at a speed that feels like an intense effort. Record your time. Then, rest for 5 minutes by gently walking or just pacing slowly back and forth.

For the strength test portion, find an area that has a solid, level, and soft surface. Grass is perfect but you can also do this indoors if you prefer. During this test, you will perform four exercises for 2 minutes each, with 3 minutes of rest between each exercise.

For the first three exercises, the goal is to count the number of perfect repetitions you can complete in 2 minutes. For a reminder on good form for these exercises, refer to the Rainier Dozen post (Week 3). If you do this with a partner, you can rest while counting their repetitions—along with providing encouragement! For the fourth exercise, the Shuttle Run, simply time yourself. Write down your scores for each test.

Perform the strength test as follows:

1. Push-ups—2 minutes, followed by 3 minutes of rest
2. Steam Engines on Back—2 minutes, followed by 3 minutes of rest
3. 3/4 Squats—2 minutes, followed by 3 minutes of rest
4. 20-yard Shuttle Run—Set up your shuttle run course with some cones or water bottles. If you aren’t sure of measurement use 25 normal paces as a guide. Run back and forth between your markers for 2 minutes, counting each loop as one.

- John Colver

Have a question? See the Fit To Climb FAQ for explanations of specific exercises and general pointers to help you through the Fit To Climb Program.

John Colver is a longtime climber, former mountain guide, and certified personal trainer with the American Council of Exercise. Colver introduced outdoor fitness classes to athletic clubs throughout the greater Puget Sound region before creating his adventX brand. Currently, adventX leads training programs in Seattle and Colver presents clinics on outdoor fitness at companies such as Microsoft, Boeing, the American Lung Association, and REI. Colver lives in Seattle, and is working on his second book, Fit to Climb - a 16 week Mount Rainier Fitness Program.


Mountaineering Training | Setting a Baseline: Evaluating Your Current Fitness

To begin a conditioning plan for mountaineering, first establish the baseline of your current fitness level.  This baseline allows you to compare your current strengths to what you’ll need on the climb.  With this, we can compose a training plan that builds steady improvement between now and the day you set off for the mountains.
 
To illuminate the task ahead, and to build a plan, consider these questions: 
• What are the physical requirements of the climb (ie. pack weight, number of days, hours spent each day)?
• How much time do I have before I climb?
• What are my fitness strengths?
• How much weight can I carry and for how long? 

To determine the physical requirements of the climb, look to RMI’s office and website.  RMI provides details on the equipment we will be carrying, the itinerary, and the duration of the climb.

How much time is there before the climb?  Take out a calendar or a blank sheet of paper and consider how to fit in the three phases of training:
1. Beginning (adaptation)
2. Building
3. Peaking (the final preparation before the climb)

Assessing your fitness strengths with a visit to a qualified athletic trainer will help to quantify your current level of fitness.  Or, visit a park and hike your favorite loop or trail with a weighted backpack to gain realistic insight into your capabilities.  What I like about assessing the time and weight is that it is simple and you can do it today.
 
As we move ahead, I encourage you to think about whether you prefer to approach your training scientifically or intuitively.  Do you prefer hiring a coach, or do you like to be your own coach? Both methods are successful - sometimes a combination is a nice way to go about it.  Throughout training, I encourage you to be consistently aware of two important factors: How long can I go? How much can I carry? On the mountain, these two things really matter. 
 
As an exercise for this week, set aside time to visit a park, sports stadium, or a local hiking area.  See how it feels. The purpose of this session is not to push to a maximum effort but to simply experience how it feels to carry a pack up and down inclines. 
 
My encouragement is to not do too much. The “safety first” rule applies to training as well as the mountains.  Too much too soon can have a negative effect, or even risk an injury.  If this is new to you… don’t feel overwhelmed if today you feel that you have a long way to go. 
 
Two years ago in October, I trained with my friend Kim Porto.  She had her sights set on climbing Mt. Rainier and trekking to Everest Base Camp during the following eighteen months.  She had never hiked before.  On day one, we walked stairs for twenty minutes with our running shoes and no pack.  It was enough.  From there, we mapped out a plan that steadily increased the training with hiking, stair work, and strength training.  By steady training over the months ahead, Kim accomplished both her Rainier climb and her trek to Everest Base Camp. 
 
Remember that moderation and consistency are the keys to success in building endurance!
 
- John Colver
 
                      
John Colver is a longtime climber, former mountain guide, and certified personal trainer with the American Council of Exercise. Colver introduced outdoor fitness classes to athletic clubs throughout the greater Puget Sound region before creating his adventX brand. Currently, adventX leads training programs in Seattle and Colver presents clinics on outdoor fitness at companies such as Microsoft, Boeing, the American Lung Association, and REI. Colver lives in Seattle.

Questions? Comments? Share your thoughts here on the RMI Blog!


RMI Named Best Outfitter by Outside Magazine

Outside Magazine Best Outfitter 2014

RMI Expeditions is pleased to be honored as Outside Magazine’s 2014 Best Outfitter! Outside selected RMI out of dozens and dozens of travel companies to be the recipient of this year’s award, recognizing our incredible guide staff, exciting mountain adventures, and dedication to responsible climbing.

“We are honored to receive Outside Magazine’s Best Outfitter for 2014. At the heart of our trips stand the incredibly talented guides who lead our adventures. With great passion, experience, and skills, our guides strive to make every trip an exciting and meaningful experience,” said Peter Whittaker, guide and owner of RMI Expeditions.

We owe a big “Thank You!” to all of the climbers who have joined us on adventures over the years and our outstanding guides. We look forward to more climbs to come!

Read Outside’s Article and see the complete list of Travel Awards winners at www.outsideonline.com/adventure-travel/travel-awards/2014-Travel-Awards-Best-Outfitter or in the April Issue available March 18th.

Read the official Press Release below:


RMI Expeditions honored by OUTSIDE Travel Awards 2014


Ashford, WA (March 4, 2014) –OUTSIDE, America’s leading active lifestyle brand, has selected RMI Expeditions as an honoree of their annual Travel Awards, which celebrate the top destinations, companies, products, and travel providers—in the U.S. and around the world—that inspire people to participate in an active lifestyle. RMI Expeditions was honored as Best Outfitter. The entire list of honorees appear in OUTSIDE’s April issue (on newsstands March 18), and online at www.outsideonline.com/travelawards.



This year, OUTSIDE tapped its global network of correspondents, who traveled across America, to Belize, Switzerland, Italy, and beyond, identifying the best new adventures, stunning lakes, gorgeous new lodges and hotels, family vacations, secret getaways, high-tech airports, and foodie hotspots. The result is more than 50 spectacular trips, plus the best travel apps, tour guides, gear, tips for traveling green, and advice for traveling solo.



“We are honored to receive Outside Magazine’s Best Outfitter for 2014. At the heart of our trips stand the incredibly talented guides who lead our adventures. With great passion, experience, and skills, our guides strive to make every trip an exciting and meaningful experience,” said Peter Whittaker, guide and owner of RMI Expeditions.



“Whether you’re looking to go big for an expedition, splurge on a luxurious paradise, or plan an epic family trip, OUTSIDE has unearthed fifty travel gems that will inspire you to renew that passport,” said OUTSIDE Editor Chris Keyes. 


RMI Expeditions, based at the foot of Mt. Rainier in Ashford, WA, leads treks, climbs, and expeditions around the world, from Mt. Rainier to the the Himalaya. Established in 1969, RMI has built a 45 year legacy of leading exceptional mountain adventures catering to climbers of all abilities. RMI’s guides are some of the most accomplished mountaineers and mountain guides in the world, including Ed Viesturs, Dave Hahn, Peter Whittaker, and Melissa Arnot. Every RMI trip is carefully vetted and planned by RMI’s guides and climbers receive extensive pre-trip support from the guides and staff before heading to the mountains. RMI’s exceptional leadership, focus on safety, personal attention, and dedication to climbing responsibly distinguish RMI as a leader in the mountaineering world.

The complete list of Travel Awards winners will be featured in the April issue of OUTSIDE, available March 18, and online at www.outsideonline.com/travelawards.
.

About RMI: RMI Expeditions (Rainier Mountaineering, Inc) is one of America’s most reputable and long-standing guide services with over 45 years of mountain guiding experience. An American Mountain Guides Association (AMGA) accredited guide service specializing in mountaineering expeditions, alpine climbing, trekking and ski touring programs, RMI is committed to leading exceptional mountain adventures.

About OUTSIDE:  OUTSIDE is America’s leading active lifestyle brand. Since 1977, OUTSIDE has covered travel, sports, adventure, health, and fitness, as well as the personalities, the environment, and the style and culture of the world Outside. The OUTSIDE family includes OUTSIDE magazine, the only magazine to win three consecutive National Magazine Awards for General Excellence, The Outside Buyer’s Guides, Outside Online, Outside Television, Outside Events, Outside+ tablet edition, Outside Books, and now Outside GO, a revolutionary, 21st-century adventure-travel company. Visit us online and on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter.


Mt. Everest Expedition: Sara McGahan on Climbing and her Studies

Hi, my name is Sara for those of you that are reading this that don’t know me, I am 16 years old, and a sophomore at The Westminster Schools in Atlanta, Georgia. I started climbing when I was 12 years old, and since then I have climbed Kilimanjaro, Elbrus, Aconcagua, Rainier, Denali (Mt. McKinley), and a bunch of other mountains.

I like climbing for a number of reasons.  I like training for climbing because I know that when I am doing it its with a goal in mind. I love the people I meet when I am climbing, and hearing all their stories and experiences. I have also been able to travel to a lot of different places like Tanzania, Argentina, Russia, Australia, Nepal, and the states of Washington, Alaska, and Colorado. Its really interesting and fun to go to all these places, and to see different people and cultures.

While on this climb I am working on two different projects for classes at my school:

1.  For science, I am measuring heart rate and blood oxygen levels at different altitudes of 4 people (including myself) to study the effects of high altitude.  I am taking readings using a small finger device and doing it twice a day.  As we move up to higher and higher altitudes its interesting to see how peoples bodies react to the altitude, and how they change as the body starts to acclimatize.

2.  Right now I am in the Northern part of Nepal and Tibet is just over the border in China. The Dali Lama is openly held in very high regard here in Nepal, but pictures of the Dali Lama are forbidden in Tibet.  For English I will be talking to people about the current situation of the Dali Lama in Tibet, their views on this situation, and any impact its had on climbing near this border and on the villages close to the border.

As I write this I am sitting in an internet cafe in Namche, Nepal.  Namche is the center for trekking and climbing in Sagarmatha National Park.  Today we took a hike from Namche, which is at about 11,200 feet, up to the villages of Khumjung, Khunde, and Syangbouche. The views from these villages are truly breath taking. Some of the men in the villages work as porters and sherpas (guides for climbers and trekkers), and the rest of the people are farmers.  Our group stopped half way at the Everest Hotel to have a coke, and we sat on the terrace with clear views of Everest, Lotse, Ama Dablam, and lots of other huge mountains.  Really, it is one of the most beautiful places in the world.


Sara McGahan

 

Good Luck Sara!!!!
Our Thoughts and Prayers are with you.
You go girl!!!!!!
Tripp, Mary Zack, Karen and Peter H’Doubler

Posted by: The H'Doubler's on 5/16/2011 at 5:32 pm

Watch out for the Yeti.

Posted by: Bob Kojack on 5/14/2011 at 10:22 am


Mountaineering Training | Fit To Climb: Week 5

Fit to Climb: Week 5 Schedule

DAY WORKOUT TOTAL TIME DIFFICULTY
1 Rainier Dozen / Easy Hiking ( 30 min) 42 min. Medium
2 Rainier Dozen / Stair Interval Training (50 min) 62 min. Hard
3 Rainier Dozen / Rest 12 min. Recovery
4 Rainier Dozen / Strength Circuit Training x 3 46 min. Hard
5 Rainier Dozen / Rest 12 min. Recovery
6 Rainier Dozen / Cross Training (1 hr) 72 min. Hard
7 Rainier Dozen / Hike (3 hrs) 192 min. Medium
Total 6 hrs 18 mins

BRIEFING
 
This week’s training plan looks very similar to last week’s. The day of your fitness test reverts back to your choice of cross-training. On day 7, the length of the hike increase by about an hour or lengthened about two miles. The primary training goal this week is to begin to extend your aerobic endurance, which you’ll achieve by the increase in length of the hike. 
 
Adding an hour may seem like a small increment; but you are going from a medium length hike to a longer one requiring a fairly substantial effort.
 
There are several subtle but important things to consider as you increase the length of your hike. One of the biggest ones is energy consumption. Many people can do a two hour hike without any special preparation, and you’ll probably have enough energy to complete it just fine. However, to be successful maintaining energy throughout a three hour hike, you’ll want to be diligent in preparing, specifically with nutrition, to make sure you have enough fuel in your body for the entire hike. Be sure to pack enough snacks to keep you fueled for the entire time! 
 
You’ll also want to consider what you carry in your day pack. On a two hour hike, you may never be more than an hour from the parking lot. As you go further out, this creates additional consideration for self-responsibility and risk management. You’ll want to make sure you have the ten essentials in your pack and also have an emergency plan in case a mishap should occur. This includes letting people know where you’re going, and/or also hiking with other people.
 
SUMMARY
 
Week five can be a positive breakthrough, the week where many people feel a demonstrable increase in their fitness. Often-times, the thing which people notice is an increased aerobic capacity; you simply can do more without getting out of breath. Some people also report feeling stronger. All of this makes sense. If you’ve done all the workouts, you’ll have logged 25 solid days of training. This amounts to 25 improvement cycles! As long as you’re practicing good self care, you can’t help but feel stronger. 
 
It’s important to acknowledge the progress and perhaps celebrate in some way. You should feel confident about what you’re doing; you’ve made significant gains and the foundation you’re building at this point will result in greater gains still as the next few weeks unfold!

- John Colver

Have a question? See the Fit To Climb FAQ for explanations of specific exercises and general pointers to help you through the Fit To Climb Program.

John Colver is a longtime climber, former mountain guide, and certified personal trainer with the American Council of Exercise. Colver introduced outdoor fitness classes to athletic clubs throughout the greater Puget Sound region before creating his adventX brand. Currently, adventX leads training programs in Seattle and Colver presents clinics on outdoor fitness at companies such as Microsoft, Boeing, the American Lung Association, and REI. Colver lives in Seattle, and is working on his second book, Fit to Climb - a 16 week Mount Rainier Fitness Program.

What a Russian Twist. Did I miss something? Also, on the stair interval training, do you recommend doing that with a weighted pack, or not?

Posted by: Linda McMillan on 3/11/2013 at 1:47 pm


Shishapangma: RMI Guide Team Returns to Kathmandu

Dear friends, family and colleagues: we are happy to get back in touch with you. Before all, we would like to apologize for the lack of communication of the last 10 days, but unfortunately, we were the most frustrated with that issue. Our satellite phone decided not to cooperate with our solar panel, and recharging the battery was an impossible task. Being the last team this season on the mountain, we could not borrow any other means of communication and we understand the worries this might have caused. But this is what being in the Himalayas brings to all of us…

That said, we are eager to announce that entire team is back safe in Kathmandu after having reached the SUMMIT ON THE CENTRAL SUMMIT OF SHISHAPANGMA at 8013metres!!!!
On Oct.11th, Bridget, Jake, Geoff and Elias reached the central summit in the mid afternoon, on a warm and cloudless day, after having followed the NW ridge for several hours from C3 (Elias and Bridget) at 7450m and from C2.5 (Geoff and Jake) at 7100m. The next day, Oct 12th, Eric and Leon, who had made shelter in C3 the previous day, started strong towards the summit. Leon reached the summit hours later, having Eric turning around well above 7600m in a wise and mature decision that honors this young, strong and smart climber, since his cold toes were not warming up in those early hours and up there you are the mercy of the temperatures.

Two days later, the entire team was reunited at Base Camp, from were we would proceed to do several back-carries to clear our gear and trash from anywhere below C1 at 6400m. After another day of rest and packing, we initiated our descent towards the trail head, also called Chinese Base Camp, were we arrived yesterday, the 16th. We were picked up by our truck (who learned about our arrival by a paper note sent down 2 days earlier with a yak shepherd) which would take us to the town of Nyalam, just a few Kilometers away from the Tibetan-Nepali border, to spend the night. This morning (Oct 17th) we made it into Nepal not without a couple small issues at the border and multiple traffic stops en-route to our hotel in Kathmandu, due to the heavy tourist season in the area. Is close to midnight here, so I will stop writing, but we will send you a good recap of the entire expedition soon.

Again, thanks to all of you for your support, your interest and the good vibrations sent. Best regards.
RMI Guide Elias de Andres Martos

Congrats Jake, Geoff, and the rest of the team! Hope you post some more photos…

Posted by: Quinn L. on 10/20/2011 at 3:15 pm

Congrats!!!  Jake, I just need to know if you skied down???
Vince Vilasi

Posted by: Vince on 10/19/2011 at 7:17 pm


Mt. Everest Expedition: Dave’s Thirteenth Everest Summit

RMI Guide Dave Hahn summits Mt. Everest for a Record Thirteenth Time. On May 20th, 2011, Dave Hahn, Linden Mallory and their Sherpa team stood on the summit of Mt. Everest on a clear and beautiful day. Congratulations!

The team has safely returned to Everest Base Camp.

Congratulations to everyone. I was disappointed that Sara and her dad didn’t summit but she has a whole lifetime to try again. I’m glad you’re back to Base Camp.

Posted by: Sue Eilers on 5/23/2011 at 7:02 am

Hi Dave….and hi there LINDEN!  Congrats to Dave on #13…but a special high five to Linden for #1 on Everest.  Very happy for you.

Steve from Team Kuwaz- Kilimanjaro

Posted by: Steve di Costanzo on 5/23/2011 at 5:28 am


Mt. Everest: Update 4-18-14

April 17th - 11:20 pm Pacific Time

RMI Guide and Everest Base Camp Manager Mark Tucker reports that RMI climbers, Sherpa and guides are safe at Everest Base Camp.  Around 7 am local time on April 18th an avalanche occured below the West Shoulder continuing down into the Khumbu Ice Fall.

Our thoughts and prayers are with the teams on Mt. Everest.

So happy you guys are all safe! Miss ya kare, I am so glad you are safe!!! Praying for the families of the Fallen Sherpa and for your continued safety.

Posted by: Farah Hedwig on 4/20/2014 at 9:05 am

Hi, Nicole! So relieved to hear you and your team are safe. Our prayers are with you all. Your dad is with me. He says “Be careful, we want you home safe. We love you and am proud of you!” xoxoxoxoxoxox
Love,
Dad and Patti Cakes

Posted by: Patti Tebo on 4/18/2014 at 12:48 pm


10 Things to Experience on the Trek to Everest Base Camp

There is something to admire around every turn of the 31 mile trail through the Khumbu Valley from Lukla to Everest Base Camp. Monasteries, cultivated fields, grazing yaks, and tiny villages all share the valley, sitting beneath the some of the world’s tallest and most stunning mountains. A few of our guides sat down to compile a list of ten things to be sure and experience on the Everest Base Camp Trek:
 
10. View From Kala Patar: It’s not widely known, but the view from the top of Kala Patar, a rocky outcropping above Gorak Shep, provides a sweeping panorama from Everest to Ama Dablam and are far better than those of Base Camp.

Views of Everest from Kala Patar (RMI Collection).  

9. Lama Geshe: A renowned spiritual leader living in a small house in Pangboche, Lama Geshe never fails to greet visitors with a deep laugh and broad smile. As he chants prayers in his native Tibetan in a deep but soft voice, he provides a fascinating appreciation and insight into the Buddhist process of embarking on a journey, whether for an Everest Expedition or a trip to visit distant relatives.

Lama Geshe blesses an RMI climber (Linden Mallory).
 
8. Momos: Akin to Chinese dumplings, the Nepalese momo is a delicious treat after a long day on the trail.

Nepali momos (RMI Collection)
 
7. Afternoon prayers at the Tengboche Monastery: After making the 1,300’ ascent to the ridge top Monastery, find a seat along the edges of the Dokhang (the prayer hall), framed by a two story tall golden statue of Buddha, and listen to the deep chants of the resident monks fill the space.

Afternoon prayers at the Tengboche Monastery (Linden Mallory)
 
6. Exploring Namche Bazaar: Perched on a hillside in the middle of the Khumbu, Namche Bazaar is the cultural and economic hub of this mountainous region. Yaks, monks, and Tibetan traders share the narrow streets with locals and trekkers alike, and a new discovery can be found around every corner, from tailors to bakeries to monasteries and museums.

Namche Bazaar at night (RMI Collection).
 
5. The experience of trekking lodge-to-lodge: After a warm breakfast served in a cozy dining room, shoulder a light day pack with only the gear you need for the day, leaving your duffel outside your door, and start up the trail. Spend the day wandering through villages, fields, and valleys, until you reach your next night’s teahouse where your bag awaits. The teahouses are simple but comfortable, with cozy community dining rooms to eat, relax, and socialize in and sleeping rooms just down the hall. 

An RMI trekker relaxes in the teahouse in Pheriche (Linden Mallory)
 
4. The Trail: While the excitement of trekking to Base Camp is reaching  the foot of Everest at the end of the trail, the wonder comes from the entire experience of traveling the trail, where a simple centuries old footpath serves as both highway through the valley and the villages’ Main Streets. Slow your pace now and again to look around and take in the shops, homes, and life that all happens right along the path!

Melissa Arnot and Peter Whittaker spinning prayer wheels on the trek to Everest Base Camp (Jake Norton / FA)
 
3. Island Peak’s summit ridge: Ringed by several of the world’s greatest mountains (Nuptse, Lhotse, Everest, and Ama Dablam), the airy summit ridge of Island Peak provides all of the excitement of Himalayan climbing in a short extension to the spring trek.

RMI climbers on Island Peak's summit ridge (Linden Mallory)
 
2. Spending the night at Everest Base Camp: you’ve walked all that way, why turn around and leave again in a matter of hours? Spending the night in Base Camp is a peek into the full experience of embarking on an Everest Expedition and enjoying a cup of tea while watching the sun peak over the top of the Western Cwm is an unforgettable moment.

RMI tents at Everest Base Camp (Jeff Martin)
 
1. Stopping to soak it all in: The Khumbu is simply an amazing place. One of the best things is just being there: stopping to dig your heels into the ground and looking around. There is nowhere else in the world like it.

RMI trekkers soaking in the view near Lobuche (Linden Mallory)

Ready to experience the Khumbu for yourself? Join RMI on a trek to Everest Base Camp!

Please see our in depth blog about hiking to everest base camp.  We have pictures, our budget, planning, and pictures/videos.  It should be very helpful for you!

http://www.ditchthemap.com/travel-blog/2016/4/15/14-day-everest-base-camp-trek-in-nepal

Posted by: Scott on 4/26/2016 at 11:30 pm

It is one of the best Everest Base Camp Trekking blog i have ever read. Really well written n knowledgeable thanks for sharing glad to read your blog.

Posted by: Everest Base Camp Trekking on 4/6/2015 at 12:26 am

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